Life

Effect of Alcohol On Your Brain & Body

Alcohol is a socially acceptable drug, but a drug nonetheless, keep reading to see the hidden secrets of alcohol!

Alcohol Is More Harmful Than You May Realize

Because companies widely advertise alcohol, we often glamorize it. However, alcohol causes severe damage to the human body. Not only for people who suffer from alcoholism but for anyone consuming more than an occasional drink.

Alcohol is a carcinogen and decreases B12 and vitamin D production in our body. It also prevents calcium absorption, causes liver damage, causes memory loss, and acts as a depressant.

We know about the effects of alcohol abuse. But not much about the results that moderate drinking can cause in the body. The fact is, even drinking small amounts of alcohol can cause permanent damage to your health. The problem is peer pressure through social groups.

We all justified drinking alcohol by saying, “I’m just having fun,” or “I’m young, and it’s expected to party a lot when you’re young.” However, in the next day, you feel horrible, and that’s because your body is trying to recover the damage you caused to yourself.

Some people can handle alcohol and use it intelligently, but in reality, the majority of people cannot. Many people binge drink or drink more frequently than their bodies can handle.

Psychiatrist’s Perspective on Alcohol Consumption

A psychologist described alcohol consumption below, and his perspective might make you rethink your relationship with this toxic substance.

 

Alcohol can catch you in a vicious cycle. You can feel sad or lack energy when you are not drinking, so you get a drink to feel that rush of dopamine in your body again. The problem is that this dopamine does not last, and it will leave you feeling sad and occasionally even worse than you felt before you chose to drink.

It often seems like the only way to relax or be talkative is to drink again, and so the cycle continues. I know that some people can relate to this feeling. The truth is that the more you build up your self-love and sense of worth, the less you will feel the need for alcohol to make you feel good.

Alchohol made me feel bad. And although I blamed much of my depression to different factors in my life, it was not until I quit drinking that I understood how much of it was just a byproduct of alcohol consumption.

Now I can say that my life has transformed since giving up alcohol last October. The choice to stop using alcohol was something I quite honestly never thought would be possible, as I couldn’t imagine myself having fun and meeting new people completely sober. But, let me tell you, it is possible.

If this information resonates with you, then perhaps you might consider cutting out alcohol for one month to see how you feel. It is never harmful to take a step back and see how these substances can affect us.

Many people do a lot of work to take care of their minds, body, and spirit, but for some reason, make an exception for a poison called alcohol. Sometimes it is good to stop and think why.

This goes for any substance at all. If you feel that you need a substance to escape life, have fun or even unwind, you should ask yourself why and start observing your actions and how you feel when you quit the substance you are taking.

Many times we forget that we are capable of so much more and we let our past define our present. Outside factors also take control of our lives many times. We forget that it is okay to feel vulnerable or tired, and only by understanding ourselves can we become the greatest versions of ourselves.

Conclusion

If you feel alcohol consumes considerable areas of your life such as the need to drink to relax, be social, or get energy again, then you should reconsider alcohol. Even drinking moderate alcohol can cause permanent damage to your body.

Try this experiment. Do not drink for a month and see how you feel. If you start to feel symptoms of desperation, then maybe you are not such a moderate drinker as you thought you were after all.

Source:
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/alcohol-effects-b12-deficiency-9699.html
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15138463
https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/alcohol-use.htm

TLC

TLC means Triple L Custodian. I'm responsible for regular updates, smooth running and administration of the website and overall vision of the brand. Founder @3LoveLifeLaughs (Triple L).

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